City Acknowledges’emergency’ via symbolic resolution

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City Acknowledges’emergency’ via symbolic resolution

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A”Nazi emergency” was announced in Dresden, Germany — a mostly symbolic move to call attention to what one local councillor known as”right-wing” and”extremist” incidents over time, say news reports.

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Councillor Max Aschenbach of Die Partei (translation: The Party) told CNN and BBC the symbolic resolution was passed on Wednesday by city councillors from the east German city that saw the birth of the anti-Islam Pegida move back into 2013.

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Students expelled from school above neo-Nazi posts

Students expelled from school above neo-Nazi posts
Launched in 2004, Die Partei is a parody party headed by a former magazine editor that is satirical, based on Euro News/Agence France Press. In a translated Facebook article Friday, the celebration known as the settlement’s departure a”first step in the right direction. “Aschenbach told CNN the term”Nazinotstand” is”an exaggerated formulation for the fact that there’s a serious problem — similar to the climate emergency — with right-wing extremism up the center of society”

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The resolution passed with 39 votes for, 29 against, according to the BBC, which mentioned local press reports. Germany’s Christian Democrats voted against the resolution, using a representative calling it”mostly a planned provocation. “The resolution notes that”right-wing extremist attitudes and activities” are happening more frequently. It calls upon Dresden to come to the aid of victims of violence, ” said the BBC.

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Reservist linked to neo-Nazi group is missing

Reservist linked to neo-Nazi group is missing
Aschenbach stated the resolution is supposed to display commitment to a”democratic, open, pluralistic society,” according to CNN.

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The CDU representative, Jan Donhauser, chairman of the CDU City Council Group, told the BBC that prioritizing right-wing extremism”does not do justice to what we desire.” “We are the guardians of the liberal-democratic basic order and no violence, regardless of where extremist side it comes, is compatible with this,” he told the British broadcaster.In Canada, the prior public security minister stated in August of the year the national government is”concerned” about white supremacy leading to acts of terrorism domestically and globally. Last summer, the Canadian government placed extremist groups.

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Canada adds neo-Nazi groups to terror list

Canada adds neo-Nazi groups to terror list


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